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Policy Insights

Researchers and collaboration partners of Population Europe as well as eminent experts from leading organisations contribute to the debate on demographic developments that are of public interest by providing insights into pressing policy issues.

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Family policies can have many unforeseen consequences. By examining Sweden’s “speed premium” policy, introduced in 1980, scholars at Stockholm University show that the policy was associated with a 24% increase in premature birth rates over the six years it was in force.

Family policies can have many unforeseen consequences. By examining Sweden’s “speed premium” policy, introduced in 1980,   Sol Pía Juárez and Enrico Debiasi show that the policy was associated with a 24% increase in premature birth rates over the six years it was in force. 

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Two young people, presumably man and woman, sit on a roof, only the legs are seen
Fertility trends can be relatively crisis-resilient. Numbers from two recent major crises in Europe show this. However, not all countries were able to stabilise or rebuild their fertility trends. New research by the EU-funded FutuRes project’s team at the SGH Warsaw School of Economics looks into resilience as a core concept for demographic change. Based on a recent review of research literature, they discuss how policies can enhance fertility resilience.

Birth rates have decreased in all EU countries. Multiple crises have aggravated this trend. However, there are signs of crisis resilience in birth rates and family planning, as new research by the EU-funded project FutuRes shows. Read here what this means for policy.

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Contrary to expectations, better gender equality does not seem to directly result in terms of higher fertility rates. Does this mean that the related policy challenges were wrongly framed? There is no doubt that gender equality continues to positively shape the opportunity structures for women and men to have children while pursuing careers.

There is no doubt that gender equality continues to positively shape the opportunity structures for women and men to have children while pursuing careers. Therefore, the push for gender equality is something that policy makers should continue to take seriously. 

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Even when respecting legitimate privacy concerns, the accessibility and use of register data for research purposes could be fundamentally improved in Europe.

Even when respecting legitimate privacy concerns, the accessibility and use of register data for research purposes could be fundamentally improved in Europe. This would not only help European research to stay competitive, but also improve science-informed policy planning.

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Over the working life, parents in Europe contribute on average about one-quarter fewer net taxes than non-parents. However, if taxes, private time and money are all taken into account and measured in comparable units, it shows that parents contribute over two-and-a-half times more than non-parents.
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Karolina_Grabowska
Since the 1970s, first births have been increasingly delayed in Europe. To complement policies that address the broader economic and social causes of delayed fertility, it is essential to raise awareness about the biological limits to late childbearing among young men and women.

 

To complement policies that address the broader economic and social causes of delayed fertility, it is essential to raise awareness about the biological limits to late childbearing.

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Subiyanto
Europe needs to prevent a freefall of fertility rates, as currently witnessed in many countries in East Asia. But policymakers should avoid pointless strategies like coercion to get people to have more children. Research shows that people want more kids, but Europe is simply not baby-friendly enough. Here are the cost-effective ways to fix this.

 

Research shows that people want more kids, but Europe is simply not baby-friendly enough. Here are the cost-effective ways to fix this.

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David Tett
Population ageing, decline of the European labour force, inequalities in economic activity between age groups and countries: all these challenges put European social systems to the test. How best to meet them? How to design resilient policy responses? Is the solution simply: more migration?

 

Population ageing, decline of the European labour force, inequalities in economic activity between age groups and countries: all these challenges put European social systems to the test. How best to meet them?