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Pop digests

PopDigests

PopDigests are short, comprehensive summaries of research results with a link to the original publication (if accessible online). This allows population experts and other interested audiences to be able to easily access information to the latest research results. 

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Rannveig K. Hart and Cathrine Holst examine policy documents spanning three decades in Norway – to gain insights into policymakers’ reasoning: Did they consider fertility effects as they were formulating family policies?

Rannveig K. Hart and Cathrine Holst examine policy documents spanning three decades in Norway – to gain insights into policymakers’ reasoning: Did they consider fertility effects as they were formulating family policies?

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Two adult women help two young children playing on a toy tractor
Do you have fewer cousins than your parents did? This is not a coincidence, but part of a broad global trend. Families are getting smaller all around the world and their composition is changing rapidly. Diego Alburez-Gutierrez, Iván Williams, and Hal Caswell outline these processes in a new paper and discuss their implications for societies.

Diego Alburez-Gutierrez, Iván Williams, and Hal Caswell's new paper projects the evolution of human kinship relationships worldwide. It shows the broad global trend that families are getting smaller and that their composition is changing rapidly.

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This study examines to what extent international migrants were overcounted in population data in Sweden from 2003 to 2016. It finds that, in general, overcounting was relatively low in this period. However, there are discrepancies across socio-demographic groups.

This study examines to what extent international migrants were overcounted in population data in Sweden from 2003 to 2016. It finds that, in general, overcounting was relatively low in this period. However, there are discrepancies across socio-demographic groups. 

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Photo by Katarzyna Grabowska
Every year, millions of people decide to leave their homes and move to Europe for many and varied reasons. But what happens to their health after the migration as they grow old in another country? Su Yeon Jang, together with Anna Oksuzyan, Mikko Myrskylä, Frank van Lenthe and Silvia Loi, explored this question in their latest paper.

Every year, millions of people decide to leave their homes and move to Europe for many and varied reasons. But what happens to their health after the migration as they grow old in another country? Su Yeon Jang, together with Anna Oksuzyan, Mikko Myrskylä, Frank van Lenthe and Silvia Loi, explored this question in their latest paper.

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Migrant journeys are complex and can be unpredictable. Migration routes can change, sometimes rapidly. This creates challenges for policy and for computer simulations of migrant routes. Researchers have identified four crucial factors for migration modelling – and they caution against oversimplifying reality.

Jakub Bijak, Souhila Belabbas and Ariana Modirrousta-Galian have identified four crucial factors for migration modelling – and they caution against oversimplifying reality.