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Education

The largest and most up-to-date study performed so far shows that the school progress of children with parents of the same sex does not differ from their peers in the United States today. This study, published in the leading journal Demography, also provides large-scale evidence that children adopted by same-sex parents do as well as children adopted by different-sex parents. [...]
This issue of the Vienna Yearbook of Population Research (2017) gives a variety of perspectives on the linkages between education and fertility in low-fertility settings.  It follows up on earlier volumes of the Vienna Yearbook that have been devoted to education and demography (2010) and to education and the global fertility transition (2012).   [...]
Migration flows are profoundly changing the composition of classrooms. Results from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveal that in 2015, almost one in four 15-year-old students in OECD countries reported that they were either foreign-born or had at least one foreign-born parent. Between 2003 and 2015, the share of students who had either migrated or who had a parent who had migrated across international borders grew by six percentage points, on average across OECD countries. [...]
From immigrant optimism to the optimism trap?
Ethnic minority students often choose more ambitious academic tracks than their native peers. However, the higher dropout rates among immigrant children at the higher secondary and university level suggest that low performing migrant students could have benefitted more from pursuing less ambitious tracks, especially in countries that offer viable vocational alternatives. [...]
Using SHARE data from eleven countries, Liudmila Antonova, Tabea Bucher-Koenen and Fabrizio Mazzonna investigate the effects of economic crises that people experience during their prime working age (20-50) on their health later in life. The results show that when comparing individuals that experienced a strong recession (GDP dropped by at least 1%) and those that did not, people that experienced a recession rate their subjective health as worse and have worse objectively measured health. This effect is significantly stronger for people with low levels of education. [...]
How gender, country and education shape the life course of young Europeans
When do young Europeans move out from their parents’ home? When do they start working? When do they get married? So far, and mostly due to data availability, little research actually focuses on the transition to adulthood from a European perspective. In this study, K. Schwanitz contributes to the literature by comparing transitions to adulthood in eight European countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania and the Netherlands). [...]
An analysis of 17 European countries
Past research has found that mortality is typically lower among those with a more advantageous socioeconomic position. The "fundamental causes" theory argues that it is the material and non-material resources associated with higher socioeconomic position, such as income, access to knowledge and social connections, that helps these individuals avoid disease, which leads to health inequalities. Johan P. Mackenbach and colleagues tested this theory to see if declines in mortality are greater among those with a higher socioeconomic position. [...]

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