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Childlessness

On the 23rd of January, the Generations & Gender Programme (GGP) and Population Europe organized a seminar at the European Parliament with the support of the MEP’s Alessia Mosca, Brando Benifei and Emilian Pavel. This event is part of the dissemination activities of the EU-project The Generations & Gender Programme – Evaluate, Plan, Initiate (GGP-EPI). [...]
The main objective of this seminar is to present and discuss findings from research on Transition to Adulthood and the future needs young generations may face in terms of family formation and ageing. We also want to discuss to what extent policies are tackling the key issues identified by scholars. This event is kindly hosted by Alessia Mosca, Brando Benifei and Emilian Pavel, Members of the European Parliament.   The programme commences with talks on the latest research findings in these fields by:   [...]
Whether more education leads to more childlessness depends on the policy context
Long before we had the numbers, it was assumed more education among women would increase childlessness among them. More education means more autonomy and/or more to lose, the arguments go. Closer study in recent years has revealed a more complicated relationship. [...]
New Book Carefully Untangles an Often-Misjudged Demographic Phenomenon
It is tempting, write Michaela Kreyenfeld and Dirk Konietzka, to regard rising childlessness in Europe as a “distinctly new and ‘post-modern’ phenomenon”. But is it really? “Is ‘voluntary’ childlessness really a new development?”, they ask. And: “Can we actually draw a line between ‘voluntary’ and ‘involuntary’ childlessness?”, "What drives childlessness in the twenty-first century?" [...]
New evidence from Switzerland
The role of income and employment on fertility patterns has already been extensively explored in the existing literature. However, empirical evidence for such effects is surprisingly scarce for Switzerland. In this recent study, Doris Hanappi, Valérie-Anne Ryser and Laura Bernardi examine the way perceived job quality is associated with the intention to have a child for men and women in Switzerland. [...]
Childlessness and the ex-post rationalisation problem
by Patrick I. Dick A couple of weeks ago, television on (the ever-encroaching) Valentine’s Day was predictably replete with romantic comedies. Most of the films I recognised had happy endings—appropriate on a day of upbeat marketing. In many cases, happy endings meant children, or at least the commitment to start a family. One network bucked the trend, however, apparently deciding that childlessness fit the bill. [...]
What’s Old, What’s New, What’s Innovative
by Michaela Kreyenfeld Explanations for childlessness have long abounded in popular culture. Some have chalked it up to decaying mores, others to cataclysmic events like war or economic disaster—still others to policy, which can be the cause or effect of any of these. But like so much in science, reality does not necessarily fit, or at least fit nicely, with what we "observe" on a daily basis. [...]
An interview with Anna Matysiak (Vienna Institute of Demography, Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital) on childlessness. Questions: 1. When friends ask me why I don’t have children, I can’t really name a reason, apart from “it just never happened”. Is that also the case for other childless women? 2. What are the most important factors in the life histories of childless women? 3. Are these factors universal, or did you find country differences? [...]
Most research so far has related the delay of parenthood to more years spent in education, the difficulties to conciliate work and family life, or to growing economic uncertainty in Europe, often assuming that once the obstacles for childbearing are removed, fertility will rise again. Less attention has been given to childlessness as a conscious decision in explaining fertility patterns. Particularly, quantitative analyses in this area are still scarce. [...]

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