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Migration and Integration

Attitudes towards immigrants in Switzerland
Education is one of the most important determinants of citizens’ attitudes towards immigrants. Positive attitudes can be related to a liberalising effect from education, which fosters tolerance and egalitarian values, while negative views can be driven by the perception of so-called intergroup competition: when natives tend to feel threatened by the presence of immigrants, for example, in the labour market. [...]
INED celebrated its 70th anniversary with special conferences, September 22, 2015. In this roundtable animated by the journalist Thierry Guerrier, the participants were : Cris Beauchemin (INED), Geneviève Jacques (La Cimade), Victor Piché (University of Montréal), Mirna Safi (Sciences po Paris). Realisation: Odile Gras © Institut national d’études démographiques [...]
Children in the household of Polish migrants decrease the propensity to leave the Netherlands
Polish migration within Europe has increased sharply since Poland’s entry to the European Union in 2004. Over the past decade, Poles are the largest group of foreign nationals settling in the Netherlands. Still, little is still known about the link between migration and family behaviours of this group of immigrants. Tom Kleinepier, Helga A. G. de Valk, and Ruben van Gaalen address this gap in their latest study and find six different types of family life paths among young adult Polish migrants. They also identify important gender differences in family and migration behaviour. [...]
“We should see large ethnic minority families as an asset for our low-fertility societies and ensure that these families are supported,” argues Hill Kulu, Professor at the University of Liverpool, in his exclusive interview for Population Europe. He offers a practical example: "In the UK, the housing stock mostly consists of two and three-bedroom houses; four-bedroom houses are seen as a luxury, but they are essential for many ethnic minority families to avoid overcrowding." In this Population Europe Press Kit, Prof. [...]
TIME FOR TWO The Population EuropeTANDEM TALK in Brussels DUBLIN REVISITED Options for a European Approach to Asylum with Prof. Dr Ulrich Becker, LL.M. (EUI) Director of the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Munich, Germany Monday, 25 January 2016 18:00 to 20:00 [...]
Immigrants’ educational selectivity positively influences their children’s level of education
Generally, the pre-migration characteristics of immigrant parents tend to be overlooked when trying to explain the educational and occupational outcomes of their children. However, along with experiences in the host country, previous experiences made in their country of origin also shape the present and future of both immigrants and their descendants. [...]
Why many migrants and their families have defied Spain’s historic economic downturn
by Amparo González-Ferrer Spanish emigration has captured headlines in recent years. It is understandable considering how historically emotive the phenomenon has become in a country so many were forced to leave throughout the 20th century. But the situation of Spain’s own immigrant population also deserves some reflection. [...]
The Example of Sweden
The world currently has more refugees and internally displaced persons than it has had since World War II. Yet the readiness of many wealthy countries to provide asylum to these refugees is waning, and a major reason for this is the fiscal burden that would result from larger refugee intakes. [...]
Europe’s refugee crisis is neither exclusively European nor limited to refugees, but rather symptomatic of the challenges facing the continent’s wider migration management strategies in an evolving global migration landscape. It is clear Europe’s disparate and often disjointed strategies will have to adapt to many types of movement as the already-thin line between economic migrant and refugee is blurred by climate change. Aging and increasingly globalised competition for talent will further complicate demands on policymakers. [...]
This paper focuses on the views and concepts of European civil society actors on the issue of demographic change and related fields. Chapter 1 clarifies the scope of this paper in terms of how EU civil society is understood, what aspects of demographic change and population policy are considered and which period of time is cov­ered. Chapter 2 provides examples of institutionalised forms of exchange between the EU and civil society organisations at the European Commission level in areas relevant to the issue of demographic change. [...]

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