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Migration and Integration

In the ‘age of migration’, where migration and mobilities are prominent daily and emotive topics on the radar of media, politicians, and wider populations, debating the processes and patterns of sub-national and international movements are imperative.  [...]
Designed as an annual conference on a variety of topics surrounding demographic challenges, the Berlin Demography Forum (BDF) offers a global, non-partisan platform for solution-oriented dialogue. [...]
New Research from Spain
A new study by researchers Maria Medvedeva and Alejandro Portes contributes to the ongoing debate about bilingual advantage and examines whether bilingual immigrant youths fare better, as well as, or worse academically than the matching group of monolinguals. Using data from Spain, where close to half of immigrants speak Spanish as their native language, they found no evidence of costs of bilingualism: [...]
Explore new estimates of migration flows between and within regions for five-year periods, 1990 to 2010. Click on a region to discover flows country-by-country.   By Nikola Sander, Guy J. Abel & Ramon Bauer  [...]
IMISCOE is Europe's largest network of scholars in the area of migration and integration. The network involves 37 member institutes and over 500 scholars from all over Europe and focuses on comparative research, publications, the organization of events, PhD training and awards and communication. The network supports more than 30 research clusters and the IMISCOE annual conferences have become a key item in the agenda of most scholars in our field. [...]
What demographic research can tell us about Europe‘s refugee crisis - an interview with Hill Kulu
“We should see large ethnic minority families as an asset for our low-fertility societies and ensure that these families are supported,” argues Hill Kulu, Professor at the University of Liverpool, in his exclusive interview for Population Europe. He offers a practical example: "In the UK, the housing stock mostly consists of two and three-bedroom houses; four-bedroom houses are seen as a luxury, but they are essential for many ethnic minority families to avoid overcrowding." [...]
Return intentions of Moroccan migrants in Europe
Some immigrants stay in their host countries while others decide to return home, but return motives can be remarkably diverse. Migrants may decide to return if they have not been able to improve their lives through migration, a situation that can perhaps be read as a ‘failure’. Others instead may make the same decision only when they have saved and remitted enough to invest in their country of origin, making the return a measure of success. [...]
Attitudes towards immigrants in Switzerland
Education is one of the most important determinants of citizens’ attitudes towards immigrants. Positive attitudes can be related to a liberalising effect from education, which fosters tolerance and egalitarian values, while negative views can be driven by the perception of so-called intergroup competition: when natives tend to feel threatened by the presence of immigrants, for example, in the labour market. To distinguish the underlying mechanisms of this relationship in Switzerland, Bram Lancee and Oriane Sarrasin tested two dimensions of education along the life course: how people’s attitudes change as they pass through education, and how these differ between individuals that have followed different paths. [...]
INED celebrated its 70th anniversary with special conferences, September 22, 2015. In this roundtable animated by the journalist Thierry Guerrier, the participants were : Cris Beauchemin (INED), Geneviève Jacques (La Cimade), Victor Piché (University of Montréal), Mirna Safi (Sciences po Paris). Realisation: Odile Gras © Institut national d’études démographiques [...]
Children in the household of Polish migrants decrease the propensity to leave the Netherlands
Polish migration within Europe has increased sharply since Poland’s entry to the European Union in 2004. Over the past decade, Poles are the largest group of foreign nationals settling in the Netherlands. Still, little is still known about the link between migration and family behaviours of this group of immigrants. Tom Kleinepier, Helga A. G. de Valk, and Ruben van Gaalen address this gap in their latest study and find six different types of family life paths among young adult Polish migrants. They also identify important gender differences in family and migration behaviour. Polish women tend to migrate with their partners, while men predominantly migrate alone and are more likely to return to the country of origin. [...]

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