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Event

SICSS Festival 2020

Jun 22
2020

The SICSS Festival 2020 will take place Monday, June 22 - Friday, June 26, 2020. During the festival, alumni from all SICSS locations would host events such as tutorials, panel discussions, or debates. These events will all be online. SICSS Festival events will be open to either current SICSS participants (at any location) or anyone that is interested; the choice of audience will be driven by the topic, learning objectives, and preferences of presenters. If you are a SICSS alumni and would like to host an event in the festival, please send us an email with a rough sketch of your idea. We will be adding events to this website as they are finalized.

Panel discussion on teaching computational social science

Time: Monday, June 22, 2020. 12-1pm EDT

Speakers: Matti Nelimarkka (SICSS-Princeton 17), Rochelle Terman (SICSS-Princeton 17), and Jae Yeon Kim (SICSS-Princeton 19)

Moderator: Matthew Salganik

Description: Teaching computational social science at both the undergraduate and graduate level presents a number of challenging pedagogical questions. How should we teach a class with students from different disciplinary backgrounds? What is the role of programming in computational social science education? How should computational social science courses fit into a larger curriculum? The panelists will address these questions—and others—first in a moderated conversation and then will take questions from the audience.

Open to: Unlimited registered participants: Registration form

Archiving: This talk will be recorded and archived.

Panel discussion on diversity in computational social science

Time: Tuesday, June 23, 2020. 3:30-4:30pm EDT

Speakers: Taylor W. Brown (SICSS-Princeton 17, SICSS-Duke 18, SICSS-Oxford 19), Naniette H. Coleman (SICSS-Princeton 19), and Tina Law (SICSS-Duke 18)

Moderator: Matthew Salganik

Description: In order to thrive, the field of computational social science requires contributions from people from different intellectual backgrounds and different life experiences. The panelists will discuss their own efforts to increase diversity in computational social science, describe why they think this work is important, explain what other efforts are underway now, and what they think should be done in the future. There will also be time for the audience to submit written questions to be asked by the moderator.

Open to: Unlimited registered participants: Registration form

Archiving: This talk will be recorded and archived.

Using Empirica for high-throughput virtual lab experiments

Time: Wednesday, June 24, 2020. 1-2:30pm EDT

Speakers: Abdullah Almaatouq (SICSS-Princeton 17), James Houghton (SICSS-Duke 20), and Nicolas Paton.

Description: Empirica is a new open source software platform for developing and conducting synchronous and interactive human-subject experiments. It has already been used by researchers around the world. This session will start with a live demonstration where participants will take part in a real-time experiment involving dozens of people. Next, the data from that experiment will be downloaded and analyzed. Thus, participants will have a behind-the-scenes, end-to-end experience with an experiment run with Emprica. Finally, there will be time for questions and discussion about Empirica and the future of experiments in the social sciences.

Open to: Up to 30 registered participants: Registration form

Preparatory materials: All registered participants are strongly encouraged to work through and watch Empirica videos A - E (link coming soon), which will require them to install software on their computers.

Archiving: This talk will be recorded and archived.

Creating open source software as part of an academic career

Time: Thursday, June 25, 2020. 11am-12pm EDT

Speakers: Ryan Gallagher (SICSS-Duke 18), Anne Helby Petersen (SICSS-Duke 18), and Carsten Schwemmer (SICSS-Duke 18)

Moderator: Matthew Salganik

Description: Almost all computational social science depends on open source software, yet very few computational social scientists actually contribute to open source software. These panelists will share their experiences developing open source software as part of an academic career, and they will offer advice for others who want to contribute to existing open source projects or start new ones. There will be time for questions from the audience.

Open to: Unlimited registered participants: Registration form

Archiving: This talk will be recorded and archived.

Opportunities and challenges with industry collaborations

Time: Friday, June 26, 2020. 10-11am EDT

Speakers: Dave Holtz (SICSS-Duke 18) and Sanaz Mobasseri (SICSS-Duke 18)

Moderator: Matthew Salganik

Description: Most big data sources are controlled by companies, and many computational social scientists struggle to get access to these data. These panelists, who have experience collaborating with companies on research projects, will share insights about initiating, developing, and maintaining productive collaborations between researchers and companies. They will discuss practical issues, such as negotiating data usage agreements and navigating legal considerations for both parties, as well as describe potential risks and ethical issues created by these collaborations. There will be time for questions from the audience.

Open to: Unlimited registered participants: Registration form

Archiving: This talk will be recorded and archived.

Event information
Date: 
22/06/2020 - 26/06/2020
Institution: 
SICSS (Summer Institutes in Computational Social Science)