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Projections and Forecasts

“How to get to 100 – and enjoy it”
Ageing is not just for old people – this was a core message at the joint opening of Population Europe’s interactive exhibition and the 3rd Berlin Demography Forum. In his opening speech Professor Wolfgang Schön, Vice-President of the Max Planck Society, reminded the more then 300 invited guests that “ageing already begins before we are born and continues to happen every time a body-cell divides. [...]
Interview with Dr. Diana López-Falcón
The JPI Data Map provides new insights and numbers on the topic of ageing. It is a joint effort of the members of the Joint Programming Innitiative (JPI) “More Years, Better Lives – The Challenges and Opportunities of Demographic Change”. The interactive Data Map is accesible online for free. Population Europe: What is the main contribution of the new Data Map?   [...]
Interview with Francesco Billari
Population Europe: On July 11th, we observe World Population Day – a time to reflect on population trends and related issues. As the President of the European Association for Population Studies (EAPS) and as the new President of Population Europe’s Council of Advisors, what would you say are the biggest challenges for future demographic research activities in Europe?   [...]
Variations of demographic patterns and trends range from very high fertility to sub-replacement fertility situations, from very young to aging populations, and from immigration-open to immigration-shy countries. This book, authored by John F. May, concludes that population policies are more necessary and relevant than ever for developed and developing countries. [...]
The relationship between the economy and population dynamics has long been discussed, but is still controversial. Fertility is commonly assumed to follow the economic cycle, falling in periods of recession and vice-versa, though scientific evidence is still not unanimous on this. This report by Giampaolo Lanzieri looks at fertility trends in 31 European countries against selected indicators of economic recession. [...]
A European team of 25 researchers focused on the issue of declining birth rates in three German-speaking countries. A summary of their findings and recommendations has now been published in a booklet that questions many commen myths. It can be downloaded for free in English, German and French (see link). The team, gathered between 2009 and 2012 by the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Leopoldina, represents various disciplines – sociology, demography, history and medicine. [...]

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