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Family and Children

Interview with Dimitri Mortelmans and Ariane Pailhé
What are the two most important findings of your research for FamiliesAndSocieties? [...]
Freelancers, social security, and the future of work in an increasingly equal, diverse, and ageing society.
by Patrick I. Dick [...]
Genes may have a say in when we have children and how many we end up with - Interview with Professor Melinda Mills, Oxford
“Loci”? “GWAS”? “NEB”? All in a day’s work for Melinda Mills, Nicola Barban, Harold Sneider, Marcel den Hoed, and their colleagues, who recently published a ground-breaking study on the genetic dimension of human reproductive behaviour. [...]
Parental separation and its effects on children’s educational attainment
Separation can strongly impact the environment in which a child grows up. In some cases, it can have the positive consequence of reducing the amount of parental conflict a child would experience. In other cases, parental separation can contribute to an increasing disadvantage for children due to a loss of financial resources or spending less time with a parent who moved out. [...]
To reconcile work and family is to improve gender and socioeconomic equality. This means the type of intervention will be just as important as its generosity. Take cash benefits for care services. Intended to provide families with flexibility, evidence suggests they subtly incentivise families to fall back on traditional divisions of household labour. Given cash, families, especially poorer families, tend to engage in more home care for their children. [...]
Partnerships, residential relocations and housing are crucial aspects of people’s well-being. All three life domains are interdependent across the life course. Some partnership events involve immediate residential relocations, for instance the establishment or the dissolution of a co-residential union. Other transitions are sequenced closely together such as marriage and the transition to homeownership. The usual approach is to assume that partnership trajectories influence residential trajectories and housing choices. [...]
What’s the role of education?
Numerous studies have confirmed that higher educated women are more likely to be involved in the labour market. However, the strength of education effects on women’s employment can be shown to vary across contexts. In a recent analysis, Nadia Steiber, Caroline Berghammer, and Barbara Haas analyze how and why education effects on women’s employment vary across countries and how these effects are modified by the presence and age of children. [...]
In recent decades, European societies have witnessed fundamental changes in partnership patterns and dynamics. Marriage rates have declined in all European countries, non-marital cohabitation has become common, divorce and separation levels have significantly increased. Changing family patterns have shaped residential and housing histories of individuals and increased the diversity of family and housing trajectories; some individuals still marry once and live in a family home for most of their lives, whereas others experience multiple partnership and housing transitions. [...]
Call for participation at a Franco-German conference from March 21 to 23, 2017 at the WZB Berlin Social Science Research Center funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) The WZB Berlin Social Science Center and the Fondation Maison des sciences de l'homme (FMSH) would like to invite interested researchers to participate in the conference “Savoir Vivre! New Challenges for Work and Family Life in Germany and France.” [...]
Family structures and its impacts on children’s education attainment
Despite the recent expansion of education, children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are still less likely to attend university than children from wealthier families. This persisting inequality in educational attainment led social scientists to explore a range of possible factors behind these unequal opportunities. Given that in many countries it is very common for children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds to live without at least one parent, family structure has often been held responsible for explaining part of the inequality of opportunities between socioeconomic groups. A recent study conducted by Fabrizio Bernardi and Diederik Boertien suggests that this claim may be unwarranted. [...]

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