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Ageing and Life Expectancy

by Erich Striessnig The future of the European project looks grim. The predominant narrative thread being woven through Europe’s media tapestry—that Europe’s near-decade-long string of crises has citizens shedding their European identities and, with it, their support for European integration—certainly gives that impression. [...]
The European Covenant on Demographic Change is bringing together the right people at the right time
by Anne-Sophie Parent Despite decades of analysis, policy responses to Europe’s rapid population ageing have focused almost exclusively on the survival of national social protection systems. This is too narrow. Rising dependency ratios (the ratio of people aged 65+ to those aged 15 – 64) certainly need attention, but population ageing brings a whole host of new policy challenges with it. The European Covenant on Demographic Change can help Europe identify and tackle them. [...]
Determining whether we are using our extra years productively
Our lives are getting longer, yes, but this does not necessarily imply more active years. As life expectancy continues to rise, there is a natural tendency to tack these additional years onto the economically in­active phases of our life course, namely to post-retirement. This can be costly for pub­lic budgets. It’s “natural”, though, because adding them anywhere else would require a conscious change to when we retire. Polit­ically, touching retirement is risky, but this is not necessarily the problem. Many countries have already begun adopt­ing measures to prolong working life. [...]
Five takeaways from the FamiliesAndSocieties European Policy Brief on intergenerational dependence
by Daniela Vono de Vilhena Whether we are sandwiched or stretched in mid-life is a matter of metaphorical consistency. How we care for our grandparents, parents and children is a matter of policy that affects just about everyone. [...]
Norms of family obligations and actual support provided to parents: a cross-national approach
Country differences in intergenerational relationships are not only due to economic, policy or housing contexts but also to a cultural tendency towards closer intergenerational ties. In a recent study, Cornelia Mureşan and Paul-Teodor Hărăguş investigated how norms of filial responsibility influence adult children to provide support to their ageing parents in several Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries as compared to Western Europe. They examined to what extent these norms are consistent with helping behaviour, whether the responsiveness to norms varies across countries, and whether CEE countries differ from societies benefiting from more generous public support to ageing people. [...]
Come to the unique (free) interactive exhibition ‘How to get to 100…and enjoy it’ and find out how you can live longer pleasantly. The exhibition runs from June 7 to June 19 in the Aa Church. [...]

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