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Ageing and Life Expectancy

The Population Europe Exhibition “How to get to 100 – and enjoy it”, which has been travelling over the past years throughout Europe, was, by invitation of Mr Heinz Becker MEP and with financial support of the Economic and Social Research Council, on display from 26th to 29th of September at the European Parliament in Brussels. [...]
An index of generational power reveals the impact of one of societies’ budding political cleavages
by Harald Wilkoszewski, Elke Loichinger, and Patrick I. Dick [...]
At this event, experts from research, policy and civil society will discuss the chances and challenges of population ageing in Europe with a special focus on active ageing and care. The programme will start with talks on the latest research findings in these fields by: [...]
Housing an older population
For the first time in history, the average age of the British population has exceeded 40. In the mid-1970s, it was 34. Thanks to our ever-improving longevity and the ageing of younger migrants, it is estimated the 60+ age group will account for 75% of the UK’s population growth by 2040. British people will be living longer in a population that is itself growing older. [...]
Population ageing, propelled by a continuous increase in old-age life expectancy and a persistent replacement level fertility, presents a challenge for many welfare states to keep up their welfare expenditure on pension, health care and all old-age services. Options for tackling this daunting challenge, such as increasing fertility and immigration levels, cutting benefits and growing public debts, present numerous obstacles. [...]
by Erich Striessnig The future of the European project looks grim. The predominant narrative thread being woven through Europe’s media tapestry—that Europe’s near-decade-long string of crises has citizens shedding their European identities and, with it, their support for European integration—certainly gives that impression. [...]

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