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Ageing and Life Expectancy

Determining whether we are using our extra years productively
Our lives are getting longer, yes, but this does not necessarily imply more active years. As life expectancy continues to rise, there is a natural tendency to tack these additional years onto the economically in­active phases of our life course, namely to post-retirement. This can be costly for pub­lic budgets. It’s “natural”, though, because adding them anywhere else would require a conscious change to when we retire. Polit­ically, touching retirement is risky, but this is not necessarily the problem. Many countries have already begun adopt­ing measures to prolong working life. [...]
Five takeaways from the Families and Societies European Policy Brief on intergenerational dependence
by Daniela Vono de Vilhena Whether we are sandwiched or stretched in mid-life is a matter of metaphorical consistency. How we care for our grandparents, parents and children is a matter of policy that affects just about everyone. [...]
Norms of family obligations and actual support provided to parents: a cross-national approach
Country differences in intergenerational relationships are not only due to economic, policy or housing contexts but also to a cultural tendency towards closer intergenerational ties. In a recent study, Cornelia Mureşan and Paul-Teodor Hărăguş investigated how norms of filial responsibility influence adult children to provide support to their ageing parents in several Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries as compared to Western Europe. They examined to what extent these norms are consistent with helping behaviour, whether the responsiveness to norms varies across countries, and whether CEE countries differ from societies benefiting from more generous public support to ageing people. [...]
Come to the unique (free) interactive exhibition ‘How to get to 100…and enjoy it’ and find out how you can live longer pleasantly. The exhibition runs from June 7 to June 19 in the Aa Church. [...]
A long and healthy life, isn’t that what we all wish for?  But what are your chances of living to 100? Can you influence this? How do your early years, your family life, where  you live, your lifestyle and your work affect these chances?  [...]
What population ageing does and does not mean for society
by Patrick I. Dick Ageism is, unfortunately, alive and well. In fact, it continues to be so pervasive that even its victims can be caught in the cycles that perpetuate it. [...]
Migration in an ageing society
As negotiations over Scotland’s fiscal future in the UK progressed earlier this year, one obstacle loomed ever larger: Scotland’s long-term low rate of pop­ulation growth and falling support ratio, the number of people contributing to versus drawing from contribution-based social policies. Negotiators are right to fret. Falling support ratios make policies like pensions costlier for society and the economy. [...]
The draft of the scientific programme for the 2016 European Population Conference in Mainz is now available online. You can find more information here: http://epc2016.princeton.edu/topics. [...]
The International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy explores the challenges arising from the ageing of populations across the globe for government, policy makers, the private sector and civil society. It examines various national state approaches to welfare provisions for older people, and highlights alternatives based around the voluntary and third-party sector, families and private initiatives. The Handbook is highly relevant for academics interested in this critical issue, and offers important messages for policy makers and practitioners. [...]
Population ageing in Western countries has made delayed retirement and extended working life a policy priority in recent years. Retirement timing has been linked to individual factors such as health and wealth, but less is known about the role of the psychosocial work environment. A paper by researcher Ewan Carr and his colleagues drew upon longitudinal data on 3462 workers aged 50–69 from five waves of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Regression models were used to assess the association of working conditions with preferred timing of retirement and actual work exit. [...]

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