You are here

Ageing and Life Expectancy

Housing an older population
For the first time in history, the average age of the British population has exceeded 40. In the mid-1970s, it was 34. Thanks to our ever-improving longevity and the ageing of younger migrants, it is estimated the 60+ age group will account for 75% of the UK’s population growth by 2040. British people will be living longer in a population that is itself growing older. [...]
Population ageing, propelled by a continuous increase in old-age life expectancy and a persistent replacement level fertility, presents a challenge for many welfare states to keep up their welfare expenditure on pension, health care and all old-age services. Options for tackling this daunting challenge, such as increasing fertility and immigration levels, cutting benefits and growing public debts, present numerous obstacles. [...]
by Erich Striessnig The future of the European project looks grim. The predominant narrative thread being woven through Europe’s media tapestry—that Europe’s near-decade-long string of crises has citizens shedding their European identities and, with it, their support for European integration—certainly gives that impression. [...]
The European Covenant on Demographic Change is bringing together the right people at the right time
by Anne-Sophie Parent Despite decades of analysis, policy responses to Europe’s rapid population ageing have focused almost exclusively on the survival of national social protection systems. This is too narrow. Rising dependency ratios (the ratio of people aged 65+ to those aged 15 – 64) certainly need attention, but population ageing brings a whole host of new policy challenges with it. The European Covenant on Demographic Change can help Europe identify and tackle them. [...]
Determining whether we are using our extra years productively
Our lives are getting longer, yes, but this does not necessarily imply more active years. As life expectancy continues to rise, there is a natural tendency to tack these additional years onto the economically in­active phases of our life course, namely to post-retirement. This can be costly for pub­lic budgets. It’s “natural”, though, because adding them anywhere else would require a conscious change to when we retire. Polit­ically, touching retirement is risky, but this is not necessarily the problem. Many countries have already begun adopt­ing measures to prolong working life. [...]

Pages