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Research News

Research News are short texts, similar to a press release, which allow users to stay updated on the partners’ research publications.

Handgrip strength is seen as a powerful predictor of mortality across individuals. However, there is no research evidence about the levels and predictive ability of grip strength for mortality in Russian populations compared to the predictive ability of grip strength of other European populations, e.g. in England and Denmark. In England life expectancy levels are close to the EU average, while grip strength levels are slightly above EU average. Denmark has a below-average life expectancy level across EU countries, but it is one of the countries with the highest grip strength scores. [...]
A look at Norway
Whether children stabilize or destabilize unions has long interested nearly everyone. Most studies by social scientists indicate the former—that kids are a stabilizing force in relationships—but union types are becoming more diverse, and with them social norms. In their recent study, Rannveig Kaldager Hart, Torkild Hovde Lyngstad and Elina Vinberg take another look at Norway and expand on previous research by including data on cohabiting couples. Plus, by using data from the Norwegian Generations and Gender Programme, they were able to look at changes over time. [...]
Social norms determine how we use our time, which affects our marriages
Between American, Spanish and French couples, who spends the most time together? With their children? Without them? The amount of time spent with one’s partner is a well-accepted indicator of marital wellbeing, but finding the time can become challenging with children. [...]
Relationship between subjective well-being and fertility for men and women in rural Ethiopia
Why are poor regions still accompanied by high fertility rates? In a new study published in Demography, Pierluigi Conzo, Giulia Fuochi and Letizia Mencarini examined the relationship between life satisfaction and fertility in rural Ethiopia. The study is based on data from the Ethiopian Rural Household Survey, a longitudinal dataset. [...]
Men and women perceive differently the consequences of work after retirement on relationships
With more time than ever to themselves, retirees’ relationships with their partners can certainly be expected to evolve. Hopefully, to improve. But as German society ages, more and more retirees are engaging in bridge employment, paid work between the retirement from full-time work and complete withdrawal from the labour market. The consequences of this trend on relationships after retirement are still unclear, but a new study from Andreas Mergenthaler and Volker Cihlar shows that, as ever, there is a gender dimension to the question. [...]
If education is the key to a brighter future, then keeping kids in school is essential. It is obvious, but not always easy. The EU recognises dropping out of school as a "new social risk", a hazard for both growth and cohesion, and has accordingly made reducing it to less than 10% a Europe 2020 priority. [...]
Does the lifestyle before childbirth influences the wellbeing of the new parents?
It is well known that having a child requires some lifestyle adjustments. Parenthood can hinder the wellbeing of new parents since it is difficult to combine the demands of a child with work and leisure. In this study, A. Roeters, J.J. Mandemakers and M. Voorpostel  take into account the lifestyle differences of individuals before becoming parents. Using data from eleven waves of the Swiss Household Panel, the researchers investigate to what extent individuals’ participation in leisure activities and paid work moderates the effects of parenthood on wellbeing. [...]
What drives Europeans to continue working after retirement age?
In European countries, working retirees form a relatively new group in the workforce. The so-called "bridge employment" that allows seniors to have paid work while simultaneously receiving their pension benefits is often seen as a resource to counteract the effects of ageing societies. In a new study, Ellen Dingemens, Kène Henkens and Hanna van Solinge explored the individual and societal factors that may affect participation in the labour force after retirement. [...]
To understand how health policies can help improve our quality of life in older ages, it is important to look at health behaviours and their relation to health outcomes. In a recent study, Liili Abuladze and colleagues examined this relationship in Estonia, where life expectancies and self-rated health among older adults are comparatively low in Europe. [...]
Using SHARE data from eleven countries, Liudmila Antonova, Tabea Bucher-Koenen and Fabrizio Mazzonna investigate the effects of economic crises that people experience during their prime working age (20-50) on their health later in life. The results show that when comparing individuals that experienced a strong recession (GDP dropped by at least 1%) and those that did not, people that experienced a recession rate their subjective health as worse and have worse objectively measured health. This effect is significantly stronger for people with low levels of education. [...]

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