You are here

Recent

Does policy play a role in how likely immigrant fathers take up leave?
Many societies, particularly in the Nordic region, have made efforts over the last decades to create more gender-equal family leave policies. These policies are supposed to encourage fathers to take time off from work to help care for their children by making it easier to do so. Once these policies are in place, it is a matter of making sure fathers actually take advantage of them. Jussi Tervola, Ann-Zofie Duvander and Eleonora Mussino took a close look at these policies to see if immigrant fathers are also using these benefits to take time off from work to help care for their children. They wanted to answer the question: Is the use of parental leave by immigrant fathers related to policy design?   [...]
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) is recruiting 1-2 full-time post-doctoral research scientists to work in one of the following research groups: Population Health, Labor Demography, or Fertility and Well-Being. Please see www.demogr.mpg.de for descriptions of these research groups. The positions are initially for 3 years, with the possibility of an extension. Starting date is flexible, with latest start fall 2018. [...]
Le vieillissement est un défi global, qui concerne l’ensemble des populations de la planète. Actuellement plus prononcé au Nord, il s’observe déjà dans les pays du Sud où il sera d’ailleurs plus rapide. Vieillir est aussi un défi personnel pour chaque individu, soucieux de maintenir son identité et sa dignité. Pour son 20e colloque et son 40e anniversaire, l’Association Internationale des Démographes de Langue Française vous invite à explorer ces niveaux d’analyse et leurs articulations, à travers quatre axes : [...]
Readiness to accept a partner with one or several children among divorcees in Europe
In the last decades, partnership markets in Europe have experienced an increase in so-called “secondary singles”, meaning individuals who have been married in the past and who are now ready to start a new relationship. For some of them, dating someone who has children may be undesirable, since taking the role of a step-parent is associated with anticipated relationship stress.  [...]
When women in Europe become mothers this often negatively affects their labour market position. Even though employment levels of migrant women are comparably low in general, little is known how motherhood affects their working life.  [...]
By Jani Turunen
Children who live full time with one parent are more likely to feel stressed than children in shared custody situations. The benefit holds regardless of the level of conflict between the parents or between parent and child. These are the results of a new study from Stockholm University’s Demography Unit. [...]
To understand how health policies can help improve our quality of life in older ages, it is important to look at health behaviours and their relation to health outcomes. In a recent study, Liili Abuladze and colleagues examined this relationship in Estonia, where life expectancies and self-rated health among older adults are comparatively low in Europe. [...]
Using SHARE data from eleven countries, Liudmila Antonova, Tabea Bucher-Koenen and Fabrizio Mazzonna investigate the effects of economic crises that people experience during their prime working age (20-50) on their health later in life. The results show that when comparing individuals that experienced a strong recession (GDP dropped by at least 1%) and those that did not, people that experienced a recession rate their subjective health as worse and have worse objectively measured health. This effect is significantly stronger for people with low levels of education. [...]
Contribution to the book "Public Social Science"
In the newly published book Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissen (Public Social Science) by Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel, several members of the Population Europe Secretariat collaborated on a chapter to share the best-practice experiences of Population Europe as a demographic research network. The chapter explains how the network assists leading researchers and research institutions in Europe in connecting with political and societal decision-makers, as well as the general public. [...]
What influence do personality traits have on divorce? And how do their effects change over time? Diederik Boertien and Dimitri Mortelmans use the psychological concept of "The Big Five" to understand the association between personality and divorce in Britain, Germany and Flanders. They determined individuals’ "Big Five" personality traits (agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism and openness to experience) using three questions for each trait based on seven-point scales ranging from "Do not agree at all" to "Fully agree". [...]

Pages