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PopDigests

PopDigests are short, comprehensive summaries of research results with a link to the original publication (if accessible online). This allows population experts and other interested audiences to be able to easily access information to the latest research results. 

Family Patterns of Immigrants and Their Descendants in Estonia
How do partnership dynamics differ between migrants and natives? Are such differences the sign of a slower integration process of immigrants into the Estonian society? Leen Rahnu, Allan Puur, Luule Sakkeus and Martin Klesment show that new family patterns, such as non-marital cohabitation, are less frequent among immigrants in Estonia. These divergences between immigrants and native Estonians suggest that the ways in which migrants start their family life more accurately reflect the patterns of the country of origin than of those of the host society. [...]
Women who restart their careers after caring for family are healthier in later life
Maximising health in later life is one of the most important policy issues for the welfare regimes of ageing societies. At the same time, health outcomes in later life can only be fully understood when also taking into account past experiences. For example, a woman who worked during most of her life might find herself with more economic and social resources later in life than a woman who mostly devoted her time to family responsibilities, and such accumulation of resources can positively influence her general health.  [...]
Researchers have identified 12 specific areas of the DNA sequence that are robustly related with the age at which we have our first child, and the total number of children we have during the course of our life. [...]
Forscher haben 12 Bereiche in der DNA-Sequenz identifiziert, die stabil damit verbunden sind, in welchem Alter wir unser erstes Kind und wie viele Kinder wir im Laufe unseres Lebens haben. [...]
Un groupe de chercheurs a identifié 12 régions spécifiques de notre ADN qui sont fortement liées à notre âge à la naissance de notre premier enfant, ainsi qu’au nombre total d’enfants que l’on aura durant notre vie. [...]
In today’s ageing societies, assessing subjective well-being  in later life has gained substantial attention among researchers, as well as among policymakers in the areas of economic, health, and social policies. However, remarkably little is known about how older adults understand their own subjective well-being and related concepts, such as quality of life, and how these concepts differ between different groups of older adults. Linden Douma, Nardi Steverink, Inge Hutter and Lousie Meijering from the University of Groningen start to fill this gap in an exploratory study of the subjective well-being of 66 older adults of different gender and age, and with different housing arrangements in northeastern Netherlands.  [...]
More public childcare vacancies can support maternal employment and improve children’s future development
Public child care provisions play a fundamental role in modern societies: They facilitate mothers’ participation in the labour market and foster children’s educational outcomes. If children spend much of the day in child care institutions, their mothers may decide to return to employment after childbirth, better reconciling work and family life. At the same time, providing education to children at early stages of life seems to have a positive impact on later social, behavioural, and cognitive outcomes.  [...]
Looking after your grandchildren will make you feel younger
Population ageing has recently boosted an extensive debate about how to measure individual aging. The chronological age, even if conventionally used, is somehow limited because it does not capture people’s own representation of aging, that is, how old people actually feel they are. In their study on the United States, Valeria Bordone and Bruno Arpino test the association between subjective age, as an alternative measure to chronological age, and two important social roles for older adults: having grandchildren and providing grandchild care. Their findings reveal that grandparenthood strongly shapes people’s own experience of ageing. [...]
Living conditions predict residential satisfaction of older people in Europe
Living conditions can affect the quality of life of older people in two different ways. The first is objective and regards the characteristics of dwellings. The second, instead, is subjective and respond to elder’s perceptions of how they accomplish the fulfilment of their needs. Both, together with their individual characteristics, build what has been defined as “residential satisfaction”. [...]
Attitudes towards immigrants in Switzerland
Education is one of the most important determinants of citizens’ attitudes towards immigrants. Positive attitudes can be related to a liberalising effect from education, which fosters tolerance and egalitarian values, while negative views can be driven by the perception of so-called intergroup competition: when natives tend to feel threatened by the presence of immigrants, for example, in the labour market. To distinguish the underlying mechanisms of this relationship in Switzerland, Bram Lancee and Oriane Sarrasin tested two dimensions of education along the life course: how people’s attitudes change as they pass through education, and how these differ between individuals that have followed different paths. [...]

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