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PopDigests

PopDigests are short, comprehensive summaries of research results with a link to the original publication (if accessible online). This allows population experts and other interested audiences to be able to easily access information to the latest research results. 

With the Brexit underway, EU migrants in the UK will soon have to make their own decisions about whether to leave or remain in the country under an alternative legal status to the one they previously held. In an environment of uncertainty, with several concrete and yet uncharted options, EU nationals are largely choosing the latter. Curiously, it’s the uncertainty surrounding their future rights to stay which leads them to having more concrete plans. [...]
PD_The road less (and less) travelled
When deciding to move, men’s careers are still prioritised, but dual-income households are less likely to go
The decision to pick up and move is a complex one. Migrating involves both direct costs — the move itself — and indirect, opportunity costs, or the foregone benefits of staying put. Moving a household exacerbates this complexity. A new study by Sergi Vidal, Francisco Perales, Philipp M. Lersch and Maria Brandén confirms that this is especially true for dual-earner couples, couples in which both members work outside the home. In principle, this means expanding female labour force participation and shrinking earnings gaps could restrict family moves in the future. The authors, however, also show that policy will have a role to play. [...]
The role of cohort effects
The share of overall mortality attributable to alcohol is higher in Europe than elsewhere in the world because of the high prevalence of alcohol consumption. There are, however, substantial differences across countries and between the sexes in levels of alcohol-related mortality. [...]
But not by segregation
To be sure, the intrinsic cultural and societal value of ethnic diversity is a hard thing to measure. The benefit of ethnic diversity is multifaceted and often intangible. Lately, it’s also been questioned. [...]
If education is the key to a brighter future, then keeping kids in school is essential. It is obvious, but not always easy. The EU recognises dropping out of school as a "new social risk", a hazard for both growth and cohesion, and has accordingly made reducing it to less than 10% a Europe 2020 priority. [...]
Whether more education leads to more childlessness depends on the policy context
Long before we had the numbers, it was assumed more education among women would increase childlessness among them. More education means more autonomy and/or more to lose, the arguments go. Closer study in recent years has revealed a more complicated relationship. A new study by Gerda Neyer, Jan Hoem and Gunnar Andersson using extensive data from Sweden and Austria shows that type and field of education can matter as much as level. [...]
Parental separation and its effects on children’s educational attainment
Separation can strongly impact the environment in which a child grows up. In some cases, it can have the positive consequence of reducing the amount of parental conflict a child would experience. In other cases, parental separation can contribute to an increasing disadvantage for children due to a loss of financial resources or spending less time with a parent who moved out. [...]
What’s the role of education?
Numerous studies have confirmed that higher educated women are more likely to be involved in the labour market. However, the strength of education effects on women’s employment can be shown to vary across contexts. In a recent analysis, Nadia Steiber, Caroline Berghammer, and Barbara Haas analyze how and why education effects on women’s employment vary across countries and how these effects are modified by the presence and age of children. [...]
Family structures and its impacts on children’s education attainment
Despite the recent expansion of education, children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are still less likely to attend university than children from wealthier families. This persisting inequality in educational attainment led social scientists to explore a range of possible factors behind these unequal opportunities. Given that in many countries it is very common for children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds to live without at least one parent, family structure has often been held responsible for explaining part of the inequality of opportunities between socioeconomic groups. A recent study conducted by Fabrizio Bernardi and Diederik Boertien suggests that this claim may be unwarranted. [...]
Divorce rates in Western countries have been increasing in recent decades and more children are also born to parents who never cohabitate.  As a result, more and more children are living in joint or sole physical custody.  [...]

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