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Policy Insights

Researchers and collaboration partners of Population Europe as well as eminent experts from leading organisations contribute to the debate on demographic developments that are of public interest by providing insights into pressing policy issues.

The integration potential of refugees in Austria is remarkable
by Isabella Buber-Ennser and Judith Kohlenberger We knew that migrants tend to be healthier, more open and better educated than the average citizen of the country they leave behind. What we didn’t expect is that this positive selection bias would be so pronounced among the refugees arriving during the most intense months of Europe’s refugee crisis. [...]
Health and caring, ten years on
by Athina Vlachantoni Taking regular care of ageing parents, vulnerable siblings or infirm spouses is an increasingly common experience in our ageing societies. [...]
Irish fathers of all stripes are now entitled to paternity leave that’s paid
by Patrick I. Dick "Simply put, the more time that fathers can spend with their babies, the better. It’s a good thing for dads, for families, and for society." [...]
Andreu Domingo Valls on what we can learn from the Catalan case
Andreu Domingo Valls, Member of the Population Europe Council of Advisors, was awarded with the City of Barcelona prize last year. [...]
In his recent book Overheating: An Anthro­pology of Accelerated Change, anthropolo­gist T. H. Eriksen astutely applies thermo­dynamic concepts to explain the economic, environmental, and identity challenges endemic to globalization that are endan­gering social reproduction. The point of friction, he argues, is a matter of scale: The challenges are global in scope but manifest at the local level. Eriksen points to overpopulation, climate change, and the accelerated production of residue—both in terms of waste and redundant people—as signs of overheating. [...]
All countries need it, but some seem to want it more than others
by Lucie Cerna Highly skilled people are an indispensable driver of economic growth, competitiveness and innovation. Countries can develop that talent on their own through investment in education and training, but there is a faster way: recruit it from abroad. Needing to respond swiftly to the challenges of today, we regularly hear politicians talk about competing globally for talent—even in the midst of widespread backlash against migration in any form. More than just talking, many are also taking action. [...]
by Fabrizio Bernardi and Gabriele Ballarino Widespread education is, without a doubt, one of the great achievements of modern, industrialised states. In gross terms, it has pulled millions out of poverty over the last century. In relative terms, it has facilitated unprecedented socio-economic mobility and, presumably, equality. Presumably. [...]
Eliminating motherhood penalties means rethinking how the cost of raising children is divided between men and women, their families, communities, employers and the state
by Irene Böckmann [...]
Even a 100% turnout by young Brits or lowering the voting age could not have prevented Brexit
by Harald Wilkoszewski Britain’s generational divide was one of the first stories to come out of the UK’s historic referendum to leave the European Union. Within hours, news that more than two-thirds of voting 18 to 24-year-olds had cast their ballot in favour of staying in the EU rippled through the mediosphere, instantly igniting debates on generational privilege and responsibility. [...]
New blueprint for the EU freedom of movement
by Jakub Bijak Full control over international migration is an illusion, not only in the context of large-scale refugee crises. There is large inertia in social, economic, political and legal processes underpinning migration, next to the vested interests of various actors, institutions, and sectors of the economy. That makes migration difficult to control in the short run, even if there is a will to do so. [...]

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