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Policy Insights

Researchers and collaboration partners of Population Europe as well as eminent experts from leading organisations contribute to the debate on demographic developments that are of public interest by providing insights into pressing policy issues.

By Jani Erola and Elina Kilpi-Jakonen
Drawing conclusions of what promotes intergenerational mobility, thus promoting more equal societies, has turned out to be rather difficult. In our edited volume, we argue that an important factor that previous studies have overlooked is compensation. This means that when resources are lacking or have suddenly been lost, some attempts are made to access other resources. These attempts may come from the children, the parents themselves, or other persons nearby, such as grandparents, other extended or new family members, or even neighbours. [...]
Early childhood education is essential, but PISA reminds us that secondary education must play a role in achieving equality
by Daniela Vono de Vilhena. In 2001, a secondary education policy debate left German society rattled. In December of that year, the OECD published its first Programme for International Student Assessment report. PISA revealed Germany, the economic engine of Europe, to be lagging behind its OECD counterparts in both performance and equality among 15-year-olds. [...]
FamiliesAndSocieties
Interview with Dimitri Mortelmans and Ariane Pailhé
What are the two most important findings of your research for FamiliesAndSocieties? [...]
Freelancers, social security, and the future of work in an increasingly equal, diverse, and ageing society.
by Patrick I. Dick [...]
Genes may have a say in when we have children and how many we end up with - Interview with Professor Melinda Mills, Oxford
“Loci”? “GWAS”? “NEB”? All in a day’s work for Melinda Mills, Nicola Barban, Harold Sneider, Marcel den Hoed, and their colleagues, who recently published a ground-breaking study on the genetic dimension of human reproductive behaviour. [...]
To reconcile work and family is to improve gender and socioeconomic equality. This means the type of intervention will be just as important as its generosity. Take cash benefits for care services. Intended to provide families with flexibility, evidence suggests they subtly incentivise families to fall back on traditional divisions of household labour. Given cash, families, especially poorer families, tend to engage in more home care for their children. [...]
Similarities, rather than differences, characterise parent-child support among migrants and non-migrants
Similarities, rather than differences, characterise parent-child support among migrants and non-migrants by Helga de Valk and Valeria Bordone As our societies age, adult sons and daughters must increasingly balance their own lives with the needs of their ageing parents. They must reconcile the preferences of their parents with their institutional setting—that junction between policies and cultural expectations. A quick look at our own lives, and it’s easy to see that always making the “right” decisions can quickly get complicated for anyone. [...]
An index of generational power reveals the impact of one of societies’ budding political cleavages
by Harald Wilkoszewski, Elke Loichinger, and Patrick I. Dick [...]
The integration potential of refugees in Austria is remarkable
by Isabella Buber-Ennser and Judith Kohlenberger We knew that migrants tend to be healthier, more open and better educated than the average citizen of the country they leave behind. What we didn’t expect is that this positive selection bias would be so pronounced among the refugees arriving during the most intense months of Europe’s refugee crisis. [...]
Health and caring, ten years on
by Athina Vlachantoni Taking regular care of ageing parents, vulnerable siblings or infirm spouses is an increasingly common experience in our ageing societies. [...]

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