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Today’s International Women’s Day, and if you would like to learn more about what science has to say about gender, Population Europe can help you. [...]
A register-based perspective on economic consequences of moving away from parental home
This article concerns severe financial problems that develop after leaving parental home. It analyses the development of financial problems after leaving one's parental home, and considers how financial problems are associated with likelihood of boomeranging (i.e. adult children returning to parental home). The 9-year follow-up study focused on a nationally representative sample of Finnish young people between the ages of 15 and 25 who moved out from their parental home between 2006 and 2009 (n = 9,196). [...]
In this paper we compare several types of economic dependency ratios for a selection of European countries. These dependency ratios take into account not only the demographic structure of the population, but also the differences in age-specific economic behaviour such as labour market activity, income and consumption as well as age-specific public transfers. [...]
The Internet has now become a habitual channel for finding a partner, but little is known about the impact of this recent partnership market on mate selection patterns. This study revisits the supply side perspective on assortative mating by exploring the role played by online venues in breeding educational, racial/ethnic and religious endogamy. It compares couples that met online (through either online dating platforms, Internet social networking, Internet gaming website, Internet chat, Internet community, etc.) to those that met through various offline contexts of interaction. [...]
A comparison of forms of care used by older natives and migrant residents in Switzerland
A close look at the ageing process betrays a complex interaction of demographic policies and factors. Old age care arrangements are a window into that interaction. But what does this mean when the ageing process also affects the migrant population? Claudio Bolzman and Giacomo Vagni compare old age care arrangements used in Switzerland by migrants and native Swiss. Specifically, they investigated whether older migrants find their way to formal care services as often as older Swiss natives despite language barriers, lower levels of education, and fewer economic resources. [...]
Interview with Prof. Helga de Valk, University of Groningen
Why do migrants choose the Netherlands? It's often thought that it is because of the high quality of the welfare state, but according to Groningen professor Helga de Valk, that’s a misconception. If it were true, then the Scandinavian countries would be the most popular, and migrants would never want to move on. The data does not support this scenario. [...]
This issue defines vulnerability as a key interdisciplinary concept for understanding life trajectories. Moreover, it develops a life course framework to study vulnerability along three structuring axes of research: multidimensionality, multilevel, and multidirectionality. [...]
Allianz European Demographer Award Winners Tomas Sobotka and Felix Tropf
Demographer Tomáš Sobotka and Sociologist Felix Tropf were honoured for their outstanding research work at the 6th Berlin Demography Forum. [...]
This paper starts with a short review of the growing literature on the topic of older migrants, particularly in relation to this population’s diversity, social vulnerability, loneliness, (transnational) care and support networks. It then introduces the collection of papers of this special issue by proposing an approach to studying older migrants as social actors who develop strategies to surpass vulnerabilities. Older migrants mobilise their resources while taking into account structural opportunities and restrictions from the meso and macro levels. [...]
New Book Carefully Untangles an Often-Misjudged Demographic Phenomenon
It is tempting, write Michaela Kreyenfeld and Dirk Konietzka, to regard rising childlessness in Europe as a “distinctly new and ‘post-modern’ phenomenon”. But is it really? “Is ‘voluntary’ childlessness really a new development?”, they ask. And: “Can we actually draw a line between ‘voluntary’ and ‘involuntary’ childlessness?”, "What drives childlessness in the twenty-first century?" [...]

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