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New research shows they do.
In a study published by the Journal of Happiness Studies, Niclas Berggren, Christian Bjørnskov and Therese Nilsson investigated the role played by laws that treat everyone equally, irrespective of sexual orientation, on people’s general life satisfaction. The authors looked at three measures of rights for gays and lesbians: (absence of) persecution (concerning the legality of same-sex relations), recognition (concerning marriage, adoption and age of consent) and protection (concerning inclusion of sexual orientation in anti-discrimination laws) in a broad set of countries. [...]
A European comparison
In the context of migration and integration, social relations are crucial. But establishing social ties in a new country takes time – sometimes over generations. In a study by Helga de Valk and Bruno Arpino, they examine whether immigrants and their children across Europe are satisfied in their life as much as natives with similar socioeconomic characteristics, and how social relations contribute to this feeling of satisfaction. [...]
An analysis of 17 European countries
Past research has found that mortality is typically lower among those with a more advantageous socioeconomic position. The "fundamental causes" theory argues that it is the material and non-material resources associated with higher socioeconomic position, such as income, access to knowledge and social connections, that helps these individuals avoid disease, which leads to health inequalities. Johan P. Mackenbach and colleagues tested this theory to see if declines in mortality are greater among those with a higher socioeconomic position. [...]
The way individuals perceive the state of their health has been found to be a predictor of longevity. Still, very little is known about the role played by genetic and environmental factors on how men and women evaluate their health status at different stages of their life course. Franz et al. (2017) start to fill this gap by using IGEMS data, an international consortium of nine existing longitudinal twin and family studies in Denmark, Sweden, and the US. The sample used included more than 12,000 adult twins ranging from 30- to 85-years-old. [...]
Population Europe sadly announces the passing of Prof. Godelieve Masuy-Stroobant (1948-2017). As the director of the Center for Demographic Research at the Université catholique de Louvain, Godelieve was one of the founding members of Population Europe in 2009 and actively supported activities, particularly during the formative years of our network, and ever since. We will miss her great support and advice and will always honor our colleague and friend in memory.   On behalf of Population Europe Dr Andreas Edel Executive Secretary   [...]
Does male preference persist after migration?
Sex ratio at birth (SRB) indicates the ratio of males to females in a population, which under undisturbed conditions tend to be approximately 104 to 106 males per 100 females born. This indicator has risen in a few Asian countries since the 1980s, and it has remained abnormally higher than expected for almost 30 years. The cases of China (115.9 in 2014), Azerbaijan (115.6 in 2013), Vietnam (112.2 average for 2013/2014), India (110.0 average for 2011/2013) and Albania (109.0 average for 2012/2013) are a few examples. [...]
Wellbeing from a life course perspective
Support of children and elderly persons is an important function of many social institutions, including the family and the public transfer system. Population ageing and increasing longevity require adaptions of these institutions as the share of dependent elderly people increases. It is of utmost importance to gain a better understanding of the way intergenerational support can be organised to be sustainable under demographic change without overburdening those who provide the support, and at the same time serve the people in the best possible way. [...]
A look at fertility levels of Russians living in Estonia
To help societies in Europe combat their decreasing fertility rates, many see the immigrant populations as a potential solution to help alleviate the situation. However, this is not always reality. In a recent study, Allan Puur and colleagues give some evidence by examining childbearing behaviours of Russians in Estonia. [...]
Higher education is one of the social fields where inequalities are produced and reproduced. Nevertheless, we still know very little about the ways in which heterogeneities and inequalities have been experienced and interpreted by those involved in international academic mobility. [...]
  Prof. dr. Clara Mulder, professor of Demography and Space at the University of Groningen and also affiliated researcher at NIDI, has been appointed as member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). [...]

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