You are here

News

Relationship between subjective well-being and fertility for men and women in rural Ethiopia
Why are poor regions still accompanied by high fertility rates? In a new study published in Demography, Pierluigi Conzo, Giulia Fuochi and Letizia Mencarini examined the relationship between life satisfaction and fertility in rural Ethiopia. The study is based on data from the Ethiopian Rural Household Survey, a longitudinal dataset. [...]
Economic consequences of career breaks by gender and age
To better understand the consequences of career breaks within the scope of governmental schemes to support a better work-life balance, research so far has mainly focused on the effects of parental leave for women and gender gaps in wage differentials. Mortelmans and Frans (2017) go beyond these shortcomings by examining the impact of career breaks on the income of both men and women, and across the life course. [...]
Out now: Population Europe's Quarterly Newsletter! Please download it here: Population Europe Newsletter July 2017.pdf If you would like to receive the newsletter via email, please sign up here. [...]
What drives Europeans to continue working after retirement age?
In European countries, working retirees form a relatively new group in the workforce. The so-called “bridge employment” that allows seniors to have paid work while simultaneously receiving their pension benefits is often seen as a resource to counteract the effects of ageing societies. In a new study, Ellen Dingemens, Kène Henkens and Hanna van Solinge explored the individual and societal factors that may affect participation in the labour force after retirement. [...]
Life Expectancy and Maximum Life Span
Life expectancy has doubled from 41 years in the 1830s to 82 years at present in Sweden. Similar trends can be observed in many other countries. Modig et al. (2017) ask whether the maximum length of life has also increased during that period. To explore the pattern of mortality above the age of 100, the researchers used individual level data on all Swedish and Danish centenarians born from 1870 to 1901 in their analysis, which equaled 3,006 men and 10,963 women. [...]
New research shows they do.
In a study published by the Journal of Happiness Studies, Niclas Berggren, Christian Bjørnskov and Therese Nilsson investigated the role played by laws that treat everyone equally, irrespective of sexual orientation, on people’s general life satisfaction. The authors looked at three measures of rights for gays and lesbians: (absence of) persecution (concerning the legality of same-sex relations), recognition (concerning marriage, adoption and age of consent) and protection (concerning inclusion of sexual orientation in anti-discrimination laws) in a broad set of countries. [...]
Who is eligible to compete? Students enrolled in PhD or Master’s programs Young researchers who have defended their PhD thesis in the last seven years   What types of paper are eligible to compete? Papers written under the researcher’s own name Papers may also be co-authored by several young researchers.   What are the rules for submitting a paper? [...]
A European comparison
In the context of migration and integration, social relations are crucial. But establishing social ties in a new country takes time – sometimes over generations. In a study by Helga de Valk and Bruno Arpino, they examine whether immigrants and their children across Europe are satisfied in their life as much as natives with similar socioeconomic characteristics, and how social relations contribute to this feeling of satisfaction. [...]
An analysis of 17 European countries
Past research has found that mortality is typically lower among those with a more advantageous socioeconomic position. The "fundamental causes" theory argues that it is the material and non-material resources associated with higher socioeconomic position, such as income, access to knowledge and social connections, that helps these individuals avoid disease, which leads to health inequalities. Johan P. Mackenbach and colleagues tested this theory to see if declines in mortality are greater among those with a higher socioeconomic position. [...]
The way individuals perceive the state of their health has been found to be a predictor of longevity. Still, very little is known about the role played by genetic and environmental factors on how men and women evaluate their health status at different stages of their life course. Franz et al. (2017) start to fill this gap by using IGEMS data, an international consortium of nine existing longitudinal twin and family studies in Denmark, Sweden, and the US. The sample used included more than 12,000 adult twins ranging from 30- to 85-years-old. [...]

Pages