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Books and Reports

This section provides an overview of selected book publications of Population Europe researchers, cooperation partners and from other sources. If available, links guide the user to the publication websites.

Rising inequality will be the single most prominent societal challenge for the EU in the coming decades, says a newly published report titled “Europe’s Societal Challenges. An analysis of global societal trends to 2030 and their impact on the EU”. The authors argue that because the EU is entering an era of long-term slow economic growth, it cannot rely on productivity growth as the engine for wellbeing. The EU must invest in its human resources, giving citizens the tools to seize all the opportunities that come their way, by boosting health, inclusion, education, skills and connectivity. [...]
This volume by Livia Sz. Oláh and Ewa Frątczak addresses the tensions between work and welfare with respect to fertility. Focusing on childbearing choices (intentions, desires) as influential predictors of future fertility, the contributors examine the importance of labour force attachment on young women's fertility plans in the context of increased labour market flexibility and differences in work-life balance policies across Europe in the early 21st century. [...]
This book, edited by Gerda Neyer, Gunnar Andersson, Hill Kulu, Laura Bernardi, and Christoph Bühler, brings together leading population researchers in the area of fertility, family, migration, life-expectancy, and mortality. The contributions present key issues of the new demography of Europe and discuss key research advances to understand the continent’s demographic development at the turn of the 21st century. [...]
This book, edited by Axel Börsch-Supan, Martina Brandt, Howard Litwin, and Guglielmo Weber, is based on the most recent waves of SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe) data collected in 2010/2011. It examines the various influences the recent crisis had on the lives of people aged 50 and over in 16 European countries. Its main purpose is to provide scientific evidence of what has changed in the activities and life-circumstances of older Europeans since the crisis has begun, and how this has affected intergenerational solidarity. [...]
Pathways through the life course have changed considerably in recent decades. Many of our assumptions about leaving home, starting new relationships and having children have been turned upside down. This volume, edited by Ann Evans and Janeen Baxter, makes use of rich longitudinal data from a unique Australian project to examine these changes. Drawing on broader theories of social change and demographic transitions in an international context, each chapter provides a detailed empirical assessment of the ways in which Australian adults negotiate their work and family lives. [...]
Migration has started to pick up again, driven largely by people moving within the European Union, after three years of continuous decline during the crisis. But the employment prospects for immigrants have worsened, with around one in two unemployed immigrants in Europe still looking for work after more than 12 months, according to the new OECD report "International Migration Outlook 2013". [...]
Variations of demographic patterns and trends range from very high fertility to sub-replacement fertility situations, from very young to aging populations, and from immigration-open to immigration-shy countries. This book, authored by John F. May, concludes that population policies are more necessary and relevant than ever for developed and developing countries. [...]
The relationship between the economy and population dynamics has long been discussed, but is still controversial. Fertility is commonly assumed to follow the economic cycle, falling in periods of recession and vice-versa, though scientific evidence is still not unanimous on this. This report by Giampaolo Lanzieri looks at fertility trends in 31 European countries against selected indicators of economic recession. [...]
A European team of 25 researchers focused on the issue of declining birth rates in three German-speaking countries. A summary of their findings and recommendations has now been published in a booklet that questions many commen myths. It can be downloaded for free in English, German and French (see link). The team, gathered between 2009 and 2012 by the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Leopoldina, represents various disciplines – sociology, demography, history and medicine. [...]
Recently published by the Demographic Research Institute of the Hungarian Central Statistical Office (Eds. Péter Őri & Zsolt Spéder), this comprehensive book describes Hungary’s demographic situation and interprets the trends in a European context. The publication aims to reach out to a broad audience by explaining demographic topics in a way that can be easily understood by experts and the general public alike. It updates the previous 2009 issue and additionally introduces two major new approaches: The first one is the emphasis on regional differences within the country. [...]

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